Publications

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Policy Dialogue Brief

Challenges to Democracy in Southeast Asia: Rethinking US Policy (pdf 94.9KB)
October 20-22, 2005

This brief, the summation of a Strategy for Peace roundtable, assesses the state of democratization and political change in Southeast Asia today and evaluates US policy toward the region.

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Report

US Policy in Southeast Asia: Fortifying the Foundation (pdf 147KB)
2003-2005

The US has long-term interest in Southeast Asia, but the policy community is not engaging the region effectively. This report—concluding a two-year program on Southeast Asia—addresses policy discrepancies and suggests a more appropriate US path.

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Policy Bulletin

Islam in Southeast Asia: What Should US Policymakers Know? (pdf 75.9KB)
November 18-19, 2004

US policy needs to be based on a more nuanced understanding of Islam in Southeast Asia. This bulletin recommends ways that US policymakers can be more aware of the complexities of Muslim politics and society in the region when making decisions.

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Policy Bulletin

New Glue or New Gloss? Southeast Asia Regionalism and US Policy (pdf 84KB)
September 23-24, 2004

ASEAN plays a key role in Southeast Asia, a role that has forced the US to reconsider its relationships in the region. This bulletin explores how US-ASEAN cooperation can benefit both sides and what it will take to strengthen the relationship.

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Policy Bulletin

US Human Rights Policy in Southeast Asia: New Issues for a New Era (pdf 82KB)
May 10-11, 2004

Regaining moral ground is imperative to improving US human rights policy in Southeast Asia as well as to strengthening American policy in the region across the board. The United States cannot maintain its bona fides as a human rights advocate if it does not acknowledge its own deficits in the protection of rights.

Southeast Asia Policy Bulletin Cover

Policy Bulletin

US Security Relations With Southeast Asia: A Dual Challenge (pdf 84KB)
March 11-12, 2004

Since the September 11 terrorist attacks, the United States has given more attention to Southeast Asia than in the preceding 25 years. This greater emphasis is generally positive for US relations with Southeast Asia, but its primary focus on counterterrorism may be too narrow. That may cause policymakers to gloss over attitudinal changes in Southeast Asian militaries and underestimate shifts in security dynamics in the region. Moreover, problems with the US image in Southeast Asia can complicate cooperation in sensitive policy areas.